Category Archives: Fly Fishing Life

Fly Fishing the Mayfly Lifecycle

Guest Blogger: Richard Fieldhouse

Trout fishing season is upon us which means you’ll be planning all those days where you can get out and enjoy the great outdoors, relax and unwind whilst you carry out a spot of fly fishing with your friends or family. Ensuring you have the right fly fishing gear and carrying out the right preparation will help to ensure that your fishing trip is organised, enjoyable, and hopefully a success.

Ever wondered why Mayflies are considered as one of the most valuable species in the world of fly fishing? The Ephemera danica, commonly known as the Mayfly, are one of the most eagerly anticipated up-winged flies a fly angler encounters on the river. Being one of the most important foods for trout due to their nutritional factor, Mayflies play a very important role during the trout fishing season. more…

A Dance of Life

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

“Vigor of youth,” they call it, and it vows to never end.
Cheap hackle ads, a Bergman book, pop music loud at work…
A creek ‘tween cornfields rumored to hold browns north of the bend;
I watched from near the guardrail silver flashes in the murk.

True trout streams… more…

Cycles of the Stream: Musings

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

From time to time I give a little thought to some of the repetitive cycles that are observable on a stream. There are many, each with its own unique periodicity–daily solar-based cycles, lunar/tidal cycles that occur in deltas but come to affect the complete watershed, lunar/monthly cycles, seasonal cycles, annual cycles, fluctuations that ebb or flood across multi-year stretches, migration cycles…the list is endless. They manifest themselves through other life form transitions, water temperatures and levels, predator behavior, water quality variations…and sometimes they include human impact.

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Taken en masse, they’re collectively enough to boggle the mind; in total they present a near-incomprehensible tangle of changing conditions and reasons for fish behaving this way or that. If on a given day an angler attempts to understand or predict the “truth” of a stream by gazing into the beam of the complete picture, he or she will go quickly blind; the complete picture is thousand-dimensional–a pulsating matrix of subtleties so complex, so intertwined, that not even our arrogant human cerebral engines can parse it. As long as we’ve been on the planet, we still grasp only a handful of the more obvious mechanisms of a stream and its inhabitants. more…