Book: "Crafting A Bamboo Fly Rod"

Book: "Crafting A Bamboo Fly Rod"

Scott Nilsson
This book was written primarily to encourage the non-professional craftsman. The purpose of this book is to help you on your journey to make a bamboo fly rod by minimizing frustration and confusion. It is intended to take some of the anxiety out of the process, which often prevents a fly fisher’s desire to go ahead and make a fine bamboo rod. Making a fine bamboo fly rod is not as difficult as you may think. My son, Tor, made a fine rod when he was twelve years old.
Book: "Crafting A Bamboo Fly Rod"

Book: "Crafting A Bamboo Fly Rod"

Scott Nilsson
This book was written primarily to encourage the non-professional craftsman. The purpose of this book is to help you on your journey to make a bamboo fly rod by minimizing frustration and confusion. It is intended to take some of the anxiety out of the process, which often prevents a fly fisher’s desire to go ahead and make a fine bamboo rod. Making a fine bamboo fly rod is not as difficult as you may think. My son, Tor, made a fine rod when he was twelve years old.
Cutthroat Trout

TROUT ARE SMART BUT THEY DON’T THINK

Mike Cline
Of course I am not talking about hot spots marked on maps but those hot spots we add to our flies, those little bits of fluorescent thread, yarn, and floss or dubbing that somehow standout over the other parts of the fly. I’ve been incorporating “hot spots” in some of my ties for a while now, but wanted to learn more about where they originated and why they work. (Yes, they do work).
Wet Flies

Wet Flies

Mary Kuss
Any fly shop owner will tell you that wet flies, whether winged or wingless, represent a very small fraction of their fly sales. When it comes to insect imitations, most fly fishers use dry flies and/or nymphs. Although we now have variations on this theme in the form of various emerger patterns, most of them look like and are fished as either a dry or a nymph. You can find books on wet flies, and magazine articles discussing their lengthy history and extolling their effectiveness. Yet still, few people use them.
There's No Such Thing As Bad Weather: Part II. Fishing When It’s Raining or Hot

There's No Such Thing As Bad Weather: Part II. Fishing When It’s Raining or Hot

Joe Dellaria
In Part 1, we looked in detail at how to layer clothing to stay warm when fishing in cold conditions (25-45 °F). This time we are going to look at how to stay dry and comfortable when it is raining and how to handle those hot, and often humid, days.
winter fly fishing

There's No Such Thing As Bad Weather: Part I. Fly Fishing in Cold Weather Conditions

Joe Dellaria
Guest Blogger: Joe Dellaria, Woodbury MN Years ago I was fishing with a friend when the weat...
Satkowski's Predator Bulkhead

Wading Through Change: Divorce and the Art of Fly Fishing

John Satkowski
A separation is always difficult despite the time involved and always leaves you feeling lost. Miles and miles of explored river will always lead to parts that you have never set your foot on. A new part of a river can be intimidating, you have to decide how to fish it, feel out all the underwater features, and take your best cast and try and hook something. That is where I am at, feeling out this new, scary unknown part of the water to see if I will take a wrong step or have sure footing. Fortunately, beyond the face of fear is freedom. That is what we are all after, the freedom to be happy and cast again no matter what the fates have in store.
Green Weenie

One Fly: Minimalism, Pragmatism, and the Greenie Weenie

Mary Kuss
  The polar opposite of this situation occurs when an angler chooses to carry and use only a single fly or fly pattern.  Perhaps the best known example is the “One-Fly” contest. The basic rules are simple.  A team of anglers draws a beat on a river, and each participant chooses one fly to use for the duration of the contest. If you lose that fly, it’s game-over for you.  The team that catches the most total inches of fish wins.  There may also be individual awards.  These contests are commonly done to benefit some charity or other, often involving stream conservation.  So whether you approve of competitive angling or not, it is for a good cause.
parachute emerger fly

Peter Pan Flies - Emergers in Neverland

Mike Cline
Many fly fishing anglers rely on emerger flies to target trout. Guest blogger Mike Cline explains what an emerger fly pattern is, and what they imitating that makes them attractive to trout.
Wedge Flies

Why We Do It: Persevering in the Face of Fly Fishing Fails

John Satkowski
After spending a ridiculous amount of money on tying materials, rods, reels, new line, and the latest and greatest gadgets, we find ourselves face to face with our scaled quarry. Have you ever sat back and thought about why we do all this just to catch a fish? For a fisherman, all that money and time spent preparing is worth it just to feel that tug at the end of your line. The moment your fly disappears or that strike indicator goes down, the little spike of excitement in your heart can be like a drug. We must get more and more of it to get our fix of this little thing called fly fishing. Cuts, bruises, and pain become inconsequential to watching a fish run at the end of your line. Norman Maclean once said,” There's certainly something in fishing that makes a man feel he is doing right; I can't explain it, but it's very pleasant.” That indescribable feeling that Norman is talking about is just that, indescribable.
Truckee River

Fly Fishing Road Trip PART TWO: Clarity & Catharsis on the Truckee River

Michael Vorhis
Road Trip Part One, the smoky half of the story, left me alongside the Truckee River in northern Nevada, tired and cold. This is part two.
brown trout

Fly Fishing Road Trip PART ONE: Where There’s Smoke...

Michael Vorhis
Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller &...
fly fishing stream

With Apologies To Noel Harrison

Michael Vorhis
Fly Fishing Poem by Michael Voris
Fly Fishing Initialisms

Fly Fishing Initialisms

Mike Cline
As I was working through a bunch of Wikipedia articles related to fly tying, it struck me that Initialisms and acronyms have to some extent permeated our avocation like they have across the spectrum of endeavors. Only uninitiated fly anglers wouldn’t be familiar with these initialisms—PMD (Pale Morning Dun), BWO (Blue Wing Olive), EHC (Elk Hair Caddis). Of course there are more obscure initialisms that might take some explaining—CDL (Coq de Leon), CDC (Cul de Canard), PTN (Pheasant Tail nymph)