Fly of the Month – The All Night Diner

Guest Blogger & Fly Tyer: Bo Wentworth of Pennsylvania, Find Bo @: https://www.instagram.com/bo_wentworth/

The flies that I tie are made out of necessity, the necessity to create art, and the necessity to create fishable flies. Sometimes both of those driving forces combine and align, The All Night Diner is a great example of this. Named after one of my favorite Modest Mouse songs, The All Night Diner is fun to tie and an effective dry fly. This pattern is a great example of how the tying art flies leads to new techniques for effective fishable patterns. I first tied this pattern late at night on a long project fly using a VKsteelworks hook.

I tied a parachute post and added a few goose biots for extra dimension and aesthetic appeal on the back of a salmon fly. The idea then came to me to add goose biots in various colors onto the parachute post for added visibility. Being able to use multiple colors like pink, orange, yellow, and blue on the same post allows the angler’s eye to pick up the differentiating color easier than a solid color post. Though a solid color is certainly easier to tie, the All Night Diner is easier to see deeper into the night.

The flies pictured are tied with moose mane, but can be tied with any body material or dubbing to match whatever insect you are trying to replicate. The goose biots on the abdomen of the fly are tied to match the post for aesthetic appeal, but when I fish this fly I will match those biots to the body material. The thorax is composed of peacock herl and can be substituted for any other material of your choosing. The parachute post pictured shows my use of a calf tail, which is a favorite material of mine wrapped in whiting farms hackle.

Here is a material List for this fly with Links:

Hook: Firehole: 317 BL Nymph Emerger Hook, TMC 200R Nymph & Dry Fly Hook
https://www.jsflyfishing.com/firehole-sticks-317-nymph-emerger-barbless-hook
https://www.jsflyfishing.com/tiemco-tmc-200r-nymph-dry-fly-hook

Body Material Moose Mane:
https://www.jsflyfishing.com/hareline-moose-mane

Goose Biots:
https://www.jsflyfishing.com/hareline-stripped-goose-biots

Hackle Whiting Farms Golden or Silver Badger or any color:
https://www.jsflyfishing.com/whiting-farms-dry-fly-saddle-bronze
https://www.jsflyfishing.com/whiting-farms-100s-saddle-pack-size-14

Thorax Peacock Dyed Peacock Strung Herl:
https://www.jsflyfishing.com/natures-spirit-dyed-peacock-strung-herl-

Parachute Post Calf Tail White:
https://www.jsflyfishing.com/hareline-calf-tail

All Night Diner Fly Tying Instructions

Step 1: The Hook
Place your hook in the vice and tie in your thread. It is important to get a nice even thread base so later our moose mane body will lay flat and even on the hook shank. On this pattern my favorite thread to use is Semperfli Nano Silk 18/0 in white.

Step 2: Parachute Post
The First material we are going to apply is the calf tail post. Take a clump of white calf tail about as long as the hook shank and lay down on top of the hook with the ends facing forward. A couple of secure wraps and trim of any excess hairs on the back end. Next wrap slowly around your clump of calf tail to orient it vertically to make your parachute post. I take a small amount of Solarez Thin Hard to the post at this point to make it a little stiffer to easily wrap our hackle later on.

Step 3: Moose Mane Body
Take two strands of moose mane one white and one black and align them so their tips are the even. Lay them down on the side of the hook shank facing towards you and slowly wrap them down with your thread. Return your thread back up the shank to the point that your calf tail has been seated. Slowly wrap your two strands of moose mane up the shank until you reach your thread and secure it down with a couple of solid wraps. This material is relatively brittle and if you are having difficulties with it breaking or cracking it can help to soak it in warm water for a few minutes before using it. For some more info on working with moose mane check out a detailed discussion on my website. Applying a uv resin over this material will help it stay in place and last longer on the water. For this application my favorite resin by far is Solarez Bone Dry.

Step 4: Thorax
Select two goose biots of any color of your choosing. For aesthetics I will match these biots to the ones we later use for the post. Tie them in right where your moose mane body ends and secure them with a few steady wraps just as you would on a pattern like a prince nymph. Next take two pieces of peacock herl and tie them in and return your thread to the eye of the hook. Wrap your peacock herl forward to the eye, whip finish and cut your thread.

Step 5: Parachute Post
Adjust your vice so it is face towards you and your fly is oriented horizontally. This allows us to take the time and easily tackle this post. Now select your goose biots of any color and begin adding them to your post. I like to add one on each side first and then the back and front. As you add each biot be mindful of their orientation, and trim the bottoms off and make sure the post is staying clean for our next step of adding our hackle.

Step 5: Hackle
Select your hackle and prepare to attach to your post. The size and color of your hackle is up to you, and there are some amazing colors to experiment with from Whiting Farms. Strip off a small amount on the side that will be wrapping around the post to keep the post looking clean. Wrap your hackle down your posty and tie it off close to the bottom of your post. A careful whip finish to not trap any fibers down and cut your thread.

Fly of the Month – Jay of the Wood

Fred Klein Author, Fly tyer and fisher of early traditional flies. Fly fishing historian, author and speaker.

It was a morning that seemed to be made for a fly fisherman. A cloudless blue sky and crystal clear river flowing strong, fed from many cold spring streams beginning their journey high in the Appalachian Ridges. The early morning shadows were receding to bright sunshine in the deep forest of hemlock, sycamore and white oak. A perfect day to try an experimental fly, with tones of blue, black bars and the subtle shades of grey dun. Designed to appeal to the big fish of these waters, guarding their hidden lair from unwelcome visitors while hiding in the shadows from the ever present bald eagles cruising the treetops throughout the daylight hours.
The fly landed in fast water before swinging past an ancient submerged log, dancing in the sunlight as it drifted deeper into the current. In an instant a large shadow appeared, giving chase with the dominance and speed of a predator… after a blue jay wet fly tied in the tradition of centuries ago, a lure that is much more than a framed show fly seen behind glass and in classic literature.


 

Origins

With origins in England, Scotland and Ireland, the jay fly found its way to the robust waters of North America. Commonly found in fly wallets as anglers first set out to match their prowess in the wild and untouched streams and rivers of an unsettled land. Early literature provides many examples of the jay wing fly with descriptions and illustrations including Charles F. Orvis’ Fishing with the Fly 1883 and Mary Orvis Marbury’s Favorite Flies and their Histories 1892. Also detailed in Ray Bergman’s Trout in 1938 just before the onset of WWII. The fly thereafter faded in popularity, rarely seen outside of museums and show fly displays.


One day a fellow fly tyer asked “at what point is a fly tied simply for its elaborate beauty and not a fishing fly?” The notion raised a question that’s answer remained on the pages of history, surely this fly was not popular without good cause.
The predominant species pursued with the fly throughout northeastern America was the brook trout and salmon, which are attracted to colorful, elaborate flies popular during the Victorian era, also fueled by the presence of seamstress and hat makers materials available in every town. As the population grew and native trout habitat gave way to the industrial era, timbering and mining, the German brown trout introduced in the 1890’s soon became the most popular trout pursued with the fly. Anglers quickly recognized that this species has a more selective palette for natural presentations.

A Jay for Brown Trout


While fishing the traditional patterns of orange, yellow and red, I decided to create a pattern more suitable for brown trout. The European jay wing, ruffed grouse hackle and olive body have natural hues that blend together in the water and has become one of my favorite flies, a nostalgic and beautiful wet fly that is just plain fun to tie and swing through the current.

On the Waters

… the massive trout raced to take the fly with tenacity and with the splash of its tail turned back toward its sanctuary. With the sting of the hook, and rush for freedom, the bamboo rod bent and the click and pawl reel started to sing as the 6 lb. tippet gave way to the fury of the powerful fish, never slowing down for a moment… taking the fly with him and leaving a memory of a beautiful wild trout in its prime, and the fly that captured his fancy.
I hope that you too tie a few jay flies and swing them through your favorite waters.

Tying Instructions:

To view the step-by-step photo instructions for this fly that Fred has included, please click here to view the document.

Jay of the Wood Dressing
Hook: Partridge of Redditch Sproat Wet or Daiichi 1550 Standard Wet Fly Hook size 2 for large trout to size 14
Tag: silver tinsel
Body: olive floss *pure silk appears more natural in the water
Ribbing: gold tinsel
Throat: peacock herl to beyond the hook bend
Hackle: ruffed grouse shoulder *brown rooster or hen saddle works well
Wing: European Jay (American Jay is protected. Jay feathers can be readily purchased online, contact Fred from his website to find out how. )
Head: camel, brown or black 8/0 thread with several coats of clear lacquer
Author Fred Klein Fly Fishing Historian, Tyer and Fisher of Classic Flies, Speaker
Visit Grizzly King Fly for more historical fly fishing articles and classic fly gallery with over 350 flies at www.grizzlykingfly.com
https://www.partridge-of-redditch.co.uk/ Pro Tyer

 

The Royal Coachman

Fred Klein Author, Fly tyer and fisher of early traditional flies. Fly fishing historian, author and speaker.

A Fly Endeared

With a new fly rod and fly box at the inquisitive age of ten, I learned to cast wet flies for brook trout in our Pennsylvania woodland stream. My life long relationship began with a beautiful fly adorned with green flash, bright white wings and a scarlet sash…

lets go back a hundred years to the beginnings of the Royal Coachman.

Beginnings

The story of the first Royal Coachman began with a fishing trip to the North Woods. The year was 1878 when a fly fisherman engaged New York City professional fly dresser John Haley to tie some Coachman flies and to “make them extra strong”,  to prevent the unraveling of the peacock herl body, and wood duck for the tail- thus the beginning of America’s favorite fly.  A few evenings later in a circle of fishermen, a discussion arose to coin the handsome fly with a name. L.C. Orvis, the brother of Charles Orvis said “ Oh that is easy enough, call it a Royal Coachman it is so finely dressed!”

Royalty was in it’s orgins, this fly which was derived from a previous favorite in America, the Coachman. A British fly originated by fisherman Tom Bosworth, also a coach driver for King George IV, Henry IV and Her Majesty Queen Victoria.