PhotoGrid_1414808938833 2Guest Blogger: Eunan Hendron, Classic Fly Tyer

While surfing the J Stockard catalog I came across the listing for hat pins which sparked a memory. Many years ago, when I was a kid, a lot of folks had a desire for classic Atlantic salmon flies tied on hat pins or brooch pins to wear as accessories. As you can imagine, there is not a huge concentration of fishermen who tie classic flies, so I’d never seen one, but often heard them talked about.

I ordered half a dozen hatpins and decided that rather than tie Atlantic salmon flies on them, I’d tie some classic wet flies. Reason for this being that the proportions of the hooks combined with the complexity of the salmon flies can make for a lot of ‘failures’.

I set on several classic Bergman flies, ordered up some necessary materials and got to work over the last week or so to get some flies tied on them. Some you will recognize, like the venerable Royal Coachman, or the Fontinalis Fin from my earlier blog post. The others are Silver Doctor, Alexandra, Parmachene Belle and finally, the Blue Jay.

I’ve since received another half dozen pins to tie up some more patterns. Perhaps I’ll try one of the less complex Atlantic salmon flies, the slip wing Lady Amherst, on one of the pins.  I think this will look excellent on a hatpin.

So, if you’re interested in tying flies on hat pins, order some up from the catalog, or if you don’t fancy giving that a go but still would like a fly on a pin, you can contact me directly. They sure look good on a nice vintage wool cap and would make great stocking stuffers for the holidays!!

fly hatpin array copy

I’ve since received another half dozen pins to tie up some more patterns. Perhaps I’ll try one of the less complex Atlantic salmon flies, the slip wing Lady Amherst, on one of the pins.  I think this will look excellent on a hatpin.

So, if you’re interested in tying flies on hat pins, order some up from the catalog, or if you don’t fancy giving that a go but still would like a fly on a pin, you can contact me directly @ [email protected]. They sure look good on a nice vintage wool cap and they make beautiful brooches too. Kate @ J. Stockard says that she has a collection and loves wearing one on a sweater. They would make a great Valentine’s Day Gift for those in your life who wonder how you manage to spend so much time at your tying bench!

2 Comments

  1. This is an interesting blog, especially the patterns that Eunan describes. I have been tying classic salmon fly patterns on brooches for a few years and selling via my website and Ebay (UK only). I have tied simple patterns like Orange Blossom, Garry, Cosseboom Special and Blue Charm. I think some of these patterns have an interest to customers, either because they fish themselves or they are attracted to the bright colours and want a fashion item that is slightly different. Not only can they be worn in the lapel, but as hat adornments and recently as alternatives to floral buttonholes at weddings.
    I am interested in trying some of the colourful trout patterns on brooches and interested in Eunan’s comments. The ‘Royal’ or ‘Teal’ series are worthy of consideration. Brooches are not just for Christmas or Birthdays; Mother’s Day is just round the corner as well as Valentines.
    Best wishes and Good Tying
    John

  2. I’ve been tying broach pins for friends as gifts for almost a year now. Mostly wooly buggers and a few Salmon / Steelhead flies. This is a great idea for patters, Thanks !!!

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