Tag Archives: Southern Salish Sea

Fly Fishing the Southern Salish Sea – Part Two

Guest Blogger: Mike Cline, Bozeman, MT

The point at Fort Flagler

The point at Fort Flagler

The kayak trip behind me, I must endure Saturday with the relatives and see one of the last unmarried nieces introduce her boyfriend to the family. But Sunday and Monday are mine. With promising morning tides in mind, I venture off well before dawn to public beaches in parks along the Puget Sound shoreline.

Blake and his guys at the fly shop helped me round out the fly box with some must have flies. With my fast 6 weight in-hand, I headed over to the Olympic Peninsula and north to Port Townsend to the beach at Fort Flagler State Park on an overcast Sunday morning. If it wasn’t insanely crowded, I was going to try for some Pinks along the point at Fort Flagler. At the peak of the bite, there were about a dozen anglers at the point and along the beach. Most were hardware or bait guys, but a few of us were tossing flies. As far as I could tell, most everyone was respectful of each other’s space. more…

Fly Fishing the Southern Salish Sea – Part One

Guest Blogger: Mike Cline, Bozeman, MT

Typical Puget Sound shoreline at low tide

Typical Puget Sound shoreline at low tide

When the tides run, the shorelines of the Southern Salish Sea resemble large rivers, the currents revealing underwater structure that provide cover and food for my favorite fish–salmonids. You may not think you know of this sea, but you do.

The southern end is commonly called the Puget Sound, that gigantic saltwater estuary that spans 100 miles north and south from Admiralty Inlet to Olympia, Washington. The Puget Sound is deep–930 feet at its deepest point, but averaging 450-600 feet deep throughout its length. The sound hosts resident Coho and Chinook salmon and seasonal runs of all five Pacific Salmon–Pinks, Coho, Chinook, Chum and Sockeye. It is also home to a thriving and readily accessible population of coastal cutthroat trout. more…