Tag Archives: fly fishing

Enjoying Fiberglass Fly Rods

Written by Paul Beel: J. Stockard Pro Tyer Team Leader and owner of FrankenFly

Through the years I have owned and casted many fly rods and for a good portion of those years I used what I could afford to use at the time. At one point I purchased an Eagle Claw Fiberglass Fly Rod for $45.00. It was a 4/5 weight and I used it exclusively. It performed very well and at such a cheap cost, it was most definitely a bargain.

As time passed by I purchased other rods which were mostly graphite. However, that first fiberglass rod had an impact on me and I began reading online websites like The Fiberglass Manifesto and joining the forum The Fiberglass Flyrodders. These places love fiberglass fly rods and discuss them still to this day.

I then bought my first custom built fiberglass fly rod from Midwest Custom Fly Rods.  The advantage of a custom built fly rod is that you get to select what you want on the rod. You can select the cork, reel seat, guides, hook keeper and color of wraps around the rod. Sometimes you have the option of picking the color of the rod, but that’s not always the case. Some rod blanks only come in a specific color and some of them have limited colors.

Of course receiving and fishing this custom build just added to the fiberglass rod enjoyment that I had already experienced in the past and just made me want another one. more…

Fly Fishing Gone Viral

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

There’s said to be an old Chinese curse that goes something along these lines:  “May you live in interesting times.”  Despite the high probability that the translation is less than precise, as stated in English it’s applicable to our current days and times.

We’re going through a curious era of our lives, sheltering in place, sheltering at home, whatever those in control of our respective territories want to call it…and now and then, as rules have very slightly relaxed, many of us have extended that to also include sheltering streamside for a few occasional hours.

And this is where fly fishing shines.

While no one stands directly in front of an angler, other kinds of fishing can be done shoulder-to-shoulder, slapping each other on the back, reaching into the same tin of sun-baked worms or trove of beer…you know what I’m talking about.  But no one can sneak up behind a fly fisherman–the back-casting sees to that.  So “social distancing” is far more assured, with the kind of fishing we do. Bright orange line colors and big yellow wooly buggers can be leveraged as highly visible warnings, much like the bold colors on a poisonous snake.  If you’re casting, you’re pretty safe.

Want to take that to the extreme?  Go with spey.  Mix the cack-handed circle spey with the classic snap-T followed by the same using a Skagit-style hand position, and then all again in reverse order from the opposite shoulder, and you’ve got yourself a whirling whizzing snapping zone of safety around yourself that not even an enemy swordsman could get through.  Try to emulate one of those atom diagrams.  It’s a “full power to the shields, Scotty” protection system.  As long as you don’t hog-tie yourself, no western lasso expert will have a thing on you, and your social distancing will rival that of the proverbial hapless desert island castaway. more…

The Royal Coachman

Fred Klein Author, Fly tyer and fisher of early traditional flies. Fly fishing historian, author and speaker.

A Fly Endeared

With a new fly rod and fly box at the inquisitive age of ten, I learned to cast wet flies for brook trout in our Pennsylvania woodland stream. My life long relationship began with a beautiful fly adorned with green flash, bright white wings and a scarlet sash…

lets go back a hundred years to the beginnings of the Royal Coachman.

Beginnings

The story of the first Royal Coachman began with a fishing trip to the North Woods. The year was 1878 when a fly fisherman engaged New York City professional fly dresser John Haley to tie some Coachman flies and to “make them extra strong”,  to prevent the unraveling of the peacock herl body, and wood duck for the tail- thus the beginning of America’s favorite fly.  A few evenings later in a circle of fishermen, a discussion arose to coin the handsome fly with a name. L.C. Orvis, the brother of Charles Orvis said “ Oh that is easy enough, call it a Royal Coachman it is so finely dressed!”

Royalty was in it’s orgins, this fly which was derived from a previous favorite in America, the Coachman. A British fly originated by fisherman Tom Bosworth, also a coach driver for King George IV, Henry IV and Her Majesty Queen Victoria.