Tag Archives: fly fishing

The “Trout” of the Bass World

J.Stockard Pro Tyer: Brandon Bailes, Athens AL

When most people hear the words “ redeye bass” they instantly think of the Rock bass species, which carry the nickname Redeye or Goggle eye here in the south, and while they can be fun from time to time ( or an annoyance if you are after smallmouth bass) there’s actually true Redeye bass species that inhabit Alabama. They are colorful, full of fight, and live in some beautiful places! more…

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum

Guest Blogger: Mike Cline, Bozeman, Montana

In 1966, the year I graduated from high school, the Academy Award for best musical score went to a farcical musical film named: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. Staring Zero Mostel and among others, Buster Keaton, the film was an adaptation of the successful Broadway play by the same name. It is a classic tale of a Roman slave seeking his freedom by helping a young noble woo a young Roman maiden. Funny as hell but having nothing to do with fly fishing. Much like Buster Keaton’s character—Erronius (A befuddled old man who is partially blind and always confused). A bit of trivia, this was Keaton’s last film in an acting career that spanned 49 years from 1917-1966. But the title did spur some thought about forums, particularly forums related to fly fishing.

In lay terms, a forum can be described as: a gathering place of great social significance, and often the scene of diverse activities, including political discussions and debates, rendezvous, meetings, markets, etc. Forums supplemented the function of a conciliabulum. That would be a great name for a trout fly if you could just figure out what it looked like. Angler to fly shop clerk, “I need a dozen #12 Olive Conciliabulums.” more…

Nymphing Subtleties: Part 2

Guest Blogger: Joe Dellaria, Woodbury MN

In Part 1 of this series, we began looking at using a two-fly set-up where the lead fly is a dry fly of your choice with a dropper to a bead head nymph. We looked at how the types of dries, the dropper length and diameter, and the size and type of bead head influence how deep the nymph will run. In the second part, we will look at how the style of the fly influences the depth and how one can adjust the different variables to consistently tick the bottom. When you get all that right, this can be a very productive style of fishing.

Style of fly. I have found that color and type of fly often doesn’t make a big difference as long as you get the nymph down to the right depth. However, there are days where color or style can be important so don’t be shy about switching nymph styles if the bite is slow. The bigger issue is how fast do you want the nymph to fall and how deep do you need to be to get fish. This is where the style of the nymph plays a huge role. For faster sink rates and deeper water, I prefer using Copper John nymphs. They drop like a rock (especially when you drop your last one accidentally into the water). I use these in deeper or faster water. If you find that you are snagging too much with a Copper John you can either downsize one size or switch to a fly style that has a slower sink rate. For these situations I like Prince and Pheasant Tail nymphs. When I am facing shallower or slower water and I want a slower sink rate, I reach for my Hare’s Ear patterns in various colors. They sink the slowest as the fuzzy body style produces drag that reduces the sink rate. more…