Monthly Archives: August 2020

Fly of the Month – Thunder Creek Minnow

Guest Blogger + FOM Tyer: Mike Cline, Bozeman, Montana

In the 1970s, Keith Fulsher, a commercial fly tyer from New York, popularized the Thunder Creek Minnow style of baitfish streamer.  The reverse bucktail style head enabled larger heads and eyes on otherwise slender baitfish patterns.  The style has been widely adapted to both fresh and saltwater species.  Although a relatively simple pattern to tie, creating a clean, secure head and eyes using the original methods takes a bit of practice.  This is where Deer Creek comes in (metaphorically).  Deer Creek is just one of many brands of UV cured cement.  Brand is not important here, but UV cured cement, Fish Masks and Living Eyes has made tying the Thunder Creek style a whole lot easier.

As I occasionally participate in fly swaps on Flytyingforum.com, I recently took the opportunity to participate in a “Classic Bucktail” swap.  The rules were simple: “Anyone up for some quick, easy classic bucktails? Don’t get hung up on “classic” patterns…get creative if you’d like.”  Swaps are great opportunities to get a bit creative so I needed a pattern I could play with.  I had all the materials I needed to create a variation of the Thunder Creek style for the swap.  The result has proven to be a pretty effective fly on my local trout streams. more…

Fly Fishing Gone Viral

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

There’s said to be an old Chinese curse that goes something along these lines:  “May you live in interesting times.”  Despite the high probability that the translation is less than precise, as stated in English it’s applicable to our current days and times.

We’re going through a curious era of our lives, sheltering in place, sheltering at home, whatever those in control of our respective territories want to call it…and now and then, as rules have very slightly relaxed, many of us have extended that to also include sheltering streamside for a few occasional hours.

And this is where fly fishing shines.

While no one stands directly in front of an angler, other kinds of fishing can be done shoulder-to-shoulder, slapping each other on the back, reaching into the same tin of sun-baked worms or trove of beer…you know what I’m talking about.  But no one can sneak up behind a fly fisherman–the back-casting sees to that.  So “social distancing” is far more assured, with the kind of fishing we do. Bright orange line colors and big yellow wooly buggers can be leveraged as highly visible warnings, much like the bold colors on a poisonous snake.  If you’re casting, you’re pretty safe.

Want to take that to the extreme?  Go with spey.  Mix the cack-handed circle spey with the classic snap-T followed by the same using a Skagit-style hand position, and then all again in reverse order from the opposite shoulder, and you’ve got yourself a whirling whizzing snapping zone of safety around yourself that not even an enemy swordsman could get through.  Try to emulate one of those atom diagrams.  It’s a “full power to the shields, Scotty” protection system.  As long as you don’t hog-tie yourself, no western lasso expert will have a thing on you, and your social distancing will rival that of the proverbial hapless desert island castaway. more…