Monthly Archives: March 2019

Fly of the Month – Guide’s Choice Pheasant Tail

Fly of the Month by J. Stockard Pro Tyer: Justin Aldrich, Haversham Co. GA, find Justin on Instagram and YouTube.

The Guides Choice series of Fly has a reputation that can easily compete with any of the old tried and true patterns. (Pheasant Tails, Hare’s Ears, and of course classic Spyder Wets for examples.)

It’s a pattern that has been done to death, understandably, and can be made to tie as easy or difficult as you choose without sacrificing production on the water if you need a quicker tie.
On a side note, it’s often I tie and fish these without a dubbed Thorax or a Flashback Wingcase. If I do this, I always use a piece of tiny flash to rib the body and wire to secure the flash. But it’s just as effective and saves massive amounts of time on the vise.

Dead drifted, Dry Dropped, Swung, Swam, Jigged, twitched, all ways to fish the Guide’s Choice series of Fly all because of the materials used.

It’s combined ingredients spell disaster for Trout. Here is my version tied with Pheasant Tail as the body instead of Hares Ear dubbing. more…

Fly Fishing the Mayfly Lifecycle

Guest Blogger: Richard Fieldhouse

Trout fishing season is upon us which means you’ll be planning all those days where you can get out and enjoy the great outdoors, relax and unwind whilst you carry out a spot of fly fishing with your friends or family. Ensuring you have the right fly fishing gear and carrying out the right preparation will help to ensure that your fishing trip is organised, enjoyable, and hopefully a success.

Ever wondered why Mayflies are considered as one of the most valuable species in the world of fly fishing? The Ephemera danica, commonly known as the Mayfly, are one of the most eagerly anticipated up-winged flies a fly angler encounters on the river. Being one of the most important foods for trout due to their nutritional factor, Mayflies play a very important role during the trout fishing season. more…

Chartreuse Magic

Guest Blogger: Mary S. Kuss, Life-long avid angler, licensed PA fishing guide, founder of the Delaware Valley Women’s Fly Fishing Association

The late Lefty Kreh famously said, “If it ain’t chartreuse, it ain’t no use!” Although that may be a bit of an exaggeration, there’s no denying the impressive and sometimes uncanny effectiveness of fly patterns incorporating this eye-catching color.

I tie and use a number of partially or all-chartreuse flies, including Clouser Deep Minnows, poppers, sliders, and Woolly Buggers. However, the first chartreuse fly I tied and fished was the infamous Green Weenie. It’s rather a simple and ugly fly, and a lot of people will not admit to using it. Yet it’s been a perennial best-seller at area fly shops for many years. Something isn’t adding up.

Those who do admit to using the Weenie, often very successfully, desperately want it to be “imitating” something. Most of them will cite its supposed resemblance to an Inchworm or a caddis larva. Although both of those insects are sometimes a rather bright green, and worm-like in shape, neither is really fluorescent chartreuse in color. Nor is the Weenie a good match for either in size or proportions. The Weenie works 12 months of the year, and in a wide variety of water types, which also serves to debunk the notion that it’s matching something. My personal opinion is that the Green Weenie is a pure behavioral trigger, and doesn’t imitate anything.

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