Tag Archives: trout stream fly fishing

Cycles of the Stream: Musings

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

From time to time I give a little thought to some of the repetitive cycles that are observable on a stream. There are many, each with its own unique periodicity–daily solar-based cycles, lunar/tidal cycles that occur in deltas but come to affect the complete watershed, lunar/monthly cycles, seasonal cycles, annual cycles, fluctuations that ebb or flood across multi-year stretches, migration cycles…the list is endless. They manifest themselves through other life form transitions, water temperatures and levels, predator behavior, water quality variations…and sometimes they include human impact.

<Figure 1 >

Taken en masse, they’re collectively enough to boggle the mind; in total they present a near-incomprehensible tangle of changing conditions and reasons for fish behaving this way or that. If on a given day an angler attempts to understand or predict the “truth” of a stream by gazing into the beam of the complete picture, he or she will go quickly blind; the complete picture is thousand-dimensional–a pulsating matrix of subtleties so complex, so intertwined, that not even our arrogant human cerebral engines can parse it. As long as we’ve been on the planet, we still grasp only a handful of the more obvious mechanisms of a stream and its inhabitants. more…

A Reply to “An Alternative to ‘Water Visibility’

Guest Blogger: Joe Dellaria, Woodbury MN

In his latest blog post, An Alternative to ‘Water Visibility’, Mike Cline provides an excellent review of many (possibly most) variables fisherman face on the river. It is clear he is a seasoned angler with much experience leading to the insights he shared. Thanks for that work!

Before going on, Mike suggests that generalizing from one stream “can’t really be compared or evaluated.” I disagree with the statement in part. That is like suggesting every time I get to a new river, I can’t apply my learnings from the rivers I have fished previously. Generalizations can be helpful. In fact, Mike’s excellent response has several generalizations. And that is appropriate. Why? Because generalizations are the beginning of learning.

Generalizations come from being observant, they help us formulate patterns. We can try applying the patterns to new situations to see if it translates. Sometimes the patterns don’t translate completely. But frequently they translate at least in part, and in the best situations, they translate almost fully. This allows fisherman to go to new bodies of water (rivers and lakes) and have more success faster. I would surmise that Mike has lots of success as he has formulated his own generalizations he shared in his recent blog. These help him be more successful. more…

Here Comes the Sun

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

There is a little known stream in Northern California that gets its water from the conical slopes of volcanic Lassen Peak. The snow from up to the 11,000-foot summit melts throughout the summer, but much of it disappears underground in the maze of lava tubes left by ancient eruptions…some of which are wide enough to drive several buses through them side by side. The water then treks nearly sixty miles barely absorbing any BTUs in its clandestine underground passages, and resurfaces as a creek that flows about half a mile along the surface and simultaneously through strata at depths of up to 100 feet. Then at the same time all these parallel rivulets of differing bedrock depths reach a high drop-off, and…some of it up on the surface and some of it issuing out of subsurface strata…it all goes over one of the most enchanting falls you’ll ever gaze upon in your life.

<Figure 1: Waterfall >

more…