Tag Archives: trout fishing

The Botched Job

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

Figure 1: The Anguish of the Botch >

My father taught me that “Anything worth doing is worth doing well.” He’d point out that a thing done hurriedly that must be done over costs time rather than saves it. I’d try to alter the axiom to “Anything worth doing is worth doing twice,” but he was not amused.

But over the years of fishing and tying flies, I’ve come up with a corollary proverb he might almost concede: “Anything botched is worth trying out.”

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The Sort of Bear Incident

Guest Blogger: Joe Dellaria, Woodbury MN

I had been trying to get my friend to try trout fishing for several months. To protect the innocent (or guilty, as the case may be), we will call him Harold. He was close to saying yes, but didn’t want to invest in fly fishing equipment and felt like fly casting was too complex. So, I suggested he could spin cast and watch me fly fish while we alternated fishing up the river. Harold thought this sounded reasonable and agreed to go.

A couple of days later I picked him up at his house. We had barely made it out of his driveway when he started asking me if there were any bear on the river.

I was surprised and asked, “Why are you asking?”

Harold, “We have had several bear sightings in our neighborhood over the past couple of months.”

I replied, “No kidding, I never knew there were bear in this area!” more…

A Reply to “An Alternative to ‘Water Visibility’

Guest Blogger: Joe Dellaria, Woodbury MN

In his latest blog post, An Alternative to ‘Water Visibility’, Mike Cline provides an excellent review of many (possibly most) variables fisherman face on the river. It is clear he is a seasoned angler with much experience leading to the insights he shared. Thanks for that work!

Before going on, Mike suggests that generalizing from one stream “can’t really be compared or evaluated.” I disagree with the statement in part. That is like suggesting every time I get to a new river, I can’t apply my learnings from the rivers I have fished previously. Generalizations can be helpful. In fact, Mike’s excellent response has several generalizations. And that is appropriate. Why? Because generalizations are the beginning of learning.

Generalizations come from being observant, they help us formulate patterns. We can try applying the patterns to new situations to see if it translates. Sometimes the patterns don’t translate completely. But frequently they translate at least in part, and in the best situations, they translate almost fully. This allows fisherman to go to new bodies of water (rivers and lakes) and have more success faster. I would surmise that Mike has lots of success as he has formulated his own generalizations he shared in his recent blog. These help him be more successful. more…