Spin rods and a guilty fly fisherman…

Guest Blogger: Jeff Marsh, High on the Fly

fishing-03Hello, I’m Jeff and I am a “Fishing Addict”.

It isn’t easy to utter those words. In the past decade or more I’ve become almost exclusively a fly fisherman. With a Blog dedicated to fly fishing, a vehicle and kayak that read like an ad out of drakemag.com and a rod collection that is measured in weights, I have realized something…..I just love to fish.

So where does this guilt of picking up a 7 1/2 foot spin rod with 10 lb test line and tossing spoons for Pike or a plow jockey for Bass come from?

I grew up with a fully stocked pond filled with Large mouth bass and Bluegill and LOVED those days out there throwing lures and worms for the pure satisfaction of a tug on the end of my line. Granted. that as fisherman I believe some of us evolve and change and look for a different challenge on the water, but I actually have guilt that I’m not throwing a tight loop or using flies that I tied. Now let’s not get confused  – my addiction and my passion is behind a fly rod – but that passion all started with a spin rod in my hand and a need to be outside chasing something bigger than me. The love of the outdoors is what started this for all of us and the fly culture is an amazing environment and some damn good reading in social media and our favorite magazines.

Maybe I’m alone in this guilt or maybe not. But I do know that this spring and summer some of my pictures may have a different look than the environments that I normally post and some of the rods may have a different set up. And, I also know for sure its about the experience and the time spent with family and friends that matters and not the hardware in our hands.

I’m Jeff and I’m proud to be a fisherman…. Are you?

2 thoughts on “Spin rods and a guilty fly fisherman…

  1. Michael Vorhis

    > I’m Jeff and I’m proud to be a fisherman…. Are you?

    No, I’m not. Well, not the ‘Jeff’ part anyway. : )

    There are enough similarities that any style of fishing is still fishing, and any of them is still better than a day doing anything else. I get out there with other gear now and then, when the terminal tackle needs more of a winch than a reel. When I dream of fishing it’s of my favorite style, but when I’m invited to a heave-dead-flesh-out-there-and-wait session, or to an exercise in dragging metallurgical impellers through the water, I do conform to the methods of whoever invited me, the better to learn something.

    Not all species will sip a #18 dressed with the mere aroma of feather; some need at least a third of a Chevrolet moving through the water to get their attention, or a lump of mackerel-smelling pie dough reeking on the bottom.

    It’s all fishing! And I’m reminded of that whenever my colleagues call me a ‘fisherman,’ and I correct them by saying I’m a ‘fly fisherman,’ but they shorten it again to ‘fisherman’ and go on to describe me sitting in a folding chair lakeside with a bunch of empty cans around me, a cold brew in the hand, the ball game on a big loud radio and a bell attached to my rod a dozen feet away. At that point I just accept the larger classification and leave it at that. : )

    Thanks Jeff for a fun article.

    – Mike

    Reply
  2. Larry Cowden

    I remember harvesting my first cane pole on my uncle’s farm to fish for bluegills and bullhead in his ponds. From there I graduated to numerous spincasts, spinning, baitcasting and fly reels and rods. I have been fortunate enough to fish salt, and fresh in all it’s forms. I have no preference for one method over the other. But to master each method in their own environment is the holy grail I think. Now I’m into building rods, flies and such. I have taken my kids fishing and now hope to pass it on to my grandson. And what better legacy could any fisherman/fisherwoman pass on to their kids and future generations?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *