Category Archives: The Art of Fly Tying

Decades of Deception

Guest Blogger: Mike Cline, Bozeman, Montana

I caught this jack in about a 1' of water off an oyster bed on a big chartreuse deceiver in mid-January. Completely unexpected. Took ~10 minutes to land with a 6 wt and the fish was well into the backing in 10 seconds. Thank goodness for sound knots!

I caught this jack in about a 1′ of water off an oyster bed on a big chartreuse deceiver in mid-January. Completely unexpected. Took ~10 minutes to land with a 6 wt and the fish was well into the backing in 10 seconds. Thank goodness for sound knots!

Deception and trickery imply acts or practices of one who deliberately deceives. Deception may or may not imply blameworthiness, since it may suggest cheating or merely tactical resource. Trickery implies ingenious acts intended to dupe or cheat. Deception is a staple of modern-day football—the play-action pass. Camouflage deceives others into not seeing you. Our pastime—fly fishing is ripe with deception. In fact, the fly fishing industry relies on the most blatant act of deception—getting fish to accept a conglomeration of fur, feathers and/or synthetics secured to a sharp but thin piece of steel as food or prey. From tiny midges to ginormous marlin flies, we fly anglers and fly tiers are masters (relatively speaking) of deception. We tie and present our flies to fish of all sorts with the sole intent to deceive then into accepting the conglomeration we call a fly as food or prey. more…

Fly of the Month-January 2017-Sparkle Zonker

Guest Blogger: Justin Bowman

FOM sparkle zonker bowman jan 2016 360x360I tie an unweighted zonker-ish fly variation. I’ve fished this fly the past few years for smallies on my local Midwest rivers. This last year, I’ve also fished it a fair amount for Driftless trout and most recently, on the Missouri River near Craig. I’m sure it will catch fish anywhere there’s hungry fish wanting to survive. On bigger or faster water, I’ll use a 7wt Rio 15ft type six sink tip line and on smaller streams, I’ll use a floating line or various trout versileaders to adjust depth. The color combinations of this fly are infinite, but black, purple, and orange will always be a personal favorite. more…

Introducing FrankenDub

FrankenDub_Col_Final2 logoDubbing is really the center of the fly tying universe. It builds bodies, heads, tails, and even covers up ugliness. There are various types of dubbing for different kinds of flies, like dry flies, nymphs, and streamers. Some dubbing is made of natural or synthetic materials and some made of both. The list of materials used in blending dubbing is a mile long. Generally you want a light dubbing that doesn’t soak up water easily for dry flies. The complete opposite is true for dubbing used to tie nymphs because they will be riding under the water’s surface and not floating on top. Streamer dubbing is a larger beast altogether that has become extremely popular with today’s fly tiers, coming in much longer fibers than dubbing used for dry flies and nymphs. more…