Category Archives: Michael Vorhis, Fly Fisher & Author

Preparing for Invasion

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

They’re coming. Like an autumn combine, like the grisly wave of death, they come. They line up at the mouth of the bay as early as July in great numbers, ravenous and unstoppable, then en masse launch their Viking-esque offensive of carnivorous dominance up this little river. They take their time, regrouping in every deep hole along the way…but only a wishful fool would wonder if they have stopped. By early October they’ve answered the call of pulsed water releases that signify storms upstream and flows to their liking…and the powerful first waves of them are making it nearly to the headwaters, leaving nowhere for local creatures to hide. The stampede will only increase through all of November and early December, and remain a threat into the new year.

They’re coming. more…

Big Antlered Brute

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

We’re all familiar with the Elk Hair Caddis dry fly pattern–very productive, easy to tie, floats high, good for prospecting, works like a wet fly if it gets sucked under. Introduced to the fly fishing world by notable tier Al Troth 61 years ago, it’s said to be a stand-in for an adult caddis fly, although its hair wing fans out far wider and higher than the closed tent-shaped wing of a real resting caddis.

Its current form differs somewhat from the original, which was in fact intended to float low, in the film, like an emerger–an eastern green caddis emerger to be specific. Despite Troth’s love for palmered-bodied flies, this one was not intended to ride high on good dry fly hackle…nor to wiggle like a soft-hackle wet. He envisioned it a ‘tweener.

But now it’s typically tied as dry as can be. The reigning theory is that its modern hairdo–the splayed-wide elk hair wing–may appear to trout to be caddis wings that are vigorously flapping rather than folded. In truth, this fly pattern lets us defy the “perfect drift” rule of fly fishing because with the application of a little gink it can be skittered across the surface, even cross-current…heck, even up-current…and doing so will draw strikes. Skittering the fly makes it resemble a caddis fly ovipositing as it dances around on the top. Trout cannot waste time studying it; they need to strike or it’ll be gone, and ‘gone’ is not in their playbook when it comes to a tasty caddis. more…

Here Comes the Sun

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

There is a little known stream in Northern California that gets its water from the conical slopes of volcanic Lassen Peak. The snow from up to the 11,000-foot summit melts throughout the summer, but much of it disappears underground in the maze of lava tubes left by ancient eruptions…some of which are wide enough to drive several buses through them side by side. The water then treks nearly sixty miles barely absorbing any BTUs in its clandestine underground passages, and resurfaces as a creek that flows about half a mile along the surface and simultaneously through strata at depths of up to 100 feet. Then at the same time all these parallel rivulets of differing bedrock depths reach a high drop-off, and…some of it up on the surface and some of it issuing out of subsurface strata…it all goes over one of the most enchanting falls you’ll ever gaze upon in your life.

<Figure 1: Waterfall >

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