Category Archives: Our Regular Contributors

Knock Knock

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

Going back a few eons here…it can be fun to remember the progressions and epiphanies of our angling and tying journeys. From time to time I take a look at the odd tying tool, be it mainstream or nouveau, and how it fits into my tying.

For some years I tied flies using various kinds of natural hair, without bothering with any hair strand alignment at all. “Natural animal hair should be all over the place…like mine is,” I reasoned, looking in the mirror. “Wind exists out there, and we should mimic its effects in our flies. Bug wings are ratty and beat to hell, and fish wouldn’t have it any other way.” So my flies looked and held together like you’d expect: Horribly. more…

On Getting Skunked

Guest Blogger: Mary S. Kuss, Life-long avid angler, licensed PA fishing guide, founder of the Delaware Valley Women’s Fly Fishing Association

One of the few certainties in fly fishing is that all of us will occasionally wind up “skunked.” As experience, knowledge, and skill increase, this unpleasant experience becomes less frequent and less likely. But the possibility never goes away entirely.

It doesn’t matter how far you travel, or how much money you spend. You can always get skunked. Hiring a good guide, and being in the right place at the right time, can certainly stack the odds in your favor. But there is never any assurance of success in terms of quantity or size of fish caught. Or indeed of catching fish at all.

This brings to mind the famous line from Tom Hanks’ character in the movie A League of Their Own: “There’s no crying in baseball!” Likewise, there are no guarantees in fly fishing. more…

Fly of the Month – The Firehole Demon

Guest Blogger: Mike Cline, Bozeman, Montana

Fishing the rise and fall of the Firehole successfully in early June has always been a challenge. Having talked with many anglers who are disappointed with the lack of hatches and failure to catch decent fish on a regular basis, I became convinced that traditional methods were fruitless. Anglers waiting for hatches waited in vain. Anglers drifting small nymphs in deep waters were frustrated for the lack of takes. Anglers swinging small buggers and soft-hackles on floating lines (a commonly recommended approach) never get those flies in front of fish. When the water is high on the Firehole, the fish, especially the browns, are taken close to the bank where they shelter in deeply submerged undercuts. You have put a fly inches from the bank and down quickly in the swift water. The take may come immediately or as the fly swings out into the current. If you are fishing along a deep bank letting the fly swing all the way to the bank and slowly retrieved may lure a fish out of an undercut you are standing near. After several years of perfecting this technique, it was time to devise a fly that would excel in the deep, tea colored waters of the Firehole. more…