Author Archives: Joe Dellaria

A Reply to “An Alternative to ‘Water Visibility’

Guest Blogger: Joe Dellaria, Woodbury MN

In his latest blog post, An Alternative to ‘Water Visibility’, Mike Cline provides an excellent review of many (possibly most) variables fisherman face on the river. It is clear he is a seasoned angler with much experience leading to the insights he shared. Thanks for that work!

Before going on, Mike suggests that generalizing from one stream “can’t really be compared or evaluated.” I disagree with the statement in part. That is like suggesting every time I get to a new river, I can’t apply my learnings from the rivers I have fished previously. Generalizations can be helpful. In fact, Mike’s excellent response has several generalizations. And that is appropriate. Why? Because generalizations are the beginning of learning.

Generalizations come from being observant, they help us formulate patterns. We can try applying the patterns to new situations to see if it translates. Sometimes the patterns don’t translate completely. But frequently they translate at least in part, and in the best situations, they translate almost fully. This allows fisherman to go to new bodies of water (rivers and lakes) and have more success faster. I would surmise that Mike has lots of success as he has formulated his own generalizations he shared in his recent blog. These help him be more successful. more…

Fly of the Month – Cammisa’s Stealth Mode

Guest Blogger & Fly Tyer of the Month: Tim Cammisa, www.troutandfeather.com

As tightline nymphing has grown in popularity, the challenge for many (including me!) has been to tie and carry flies that can be applicable to a variety of situations throughout the year. When I first started experimenting with jig nymphs, I stuck with “traditional” patterns that could be slightly modified, then expanded into newer styles; Cammisa’s Stealth Mode was a fly that consistently produced since its inception. Similar to a Lightning Bug, there are some subtle changes that I’ve made, helping the fly to take on a darker, yet still distinct, appearance.

This pattern’s effectiveness relates to its rear hot spot and body material, both of which attempt to grab the fish’s attention.  Hot spots are here to stay, and Glo-Brite can be utilized in different ways.  A rear hot spot simply changes the location and gives the fish a look at something different.  Don’t be afraid to vary the color because my experience has shown that other colors produce (fluorescent orange is a favorite for brown trout).  The holographic UNI-Mylar is a favorite of mine for adding flash to many patterns, i.e. Flashback Pheasant Tail.  Using the material for the body can be a challenge, thus be sure to pull it taut before winding forward.  Finally, I use a drop of head cement over the hot spot for protection, and will even coat the entire body with Solarez Bone Dry before dubbing the thorax. more…

Quick Review: Barred Variant Strung Schlappen

Guest Blogger: Paul Beel, J. Stockard Pro Tyer and owner of FrankenFly.

I had a chance to tie with and test out Nature’s Spirit’s Barred Variant Strung Schlappen recently and here are my thoughts.

The barred schlappen from Nature’s Spirit comes in a package with a decent bundle of feathers. The feathers are brilliantly barred and made quite an impact when I first opened the package. The feathers are long and in excellent shape. For testing purposes, I used two feathers and made a tail from them on a large articulated streamer (pictured below). These feathers work perfectly for this type of application, and you could also easily take the feather and wrap it around the shank of the hook to form a collar or palmer it across a body to make a full body of a streamer. It was easy to see these feathers would look terrific in the water and they did. The webby fibers flow great in the water.

You need to keep in mind that with the barring, comes a higher price. You can get regular schlappen feathers without the barring for less. However, I believe that various colors on a streamer will attract fish so I think the barring can make a significant difference.

To summarize, I think Nature’s Spirit has a quality product in their Barred Variant Strung Schlappen. I would definitely recommend these if you are in the market for barred schlappen feathers.