Monthly Archives: January 2017

Fly of the Month-Feb 2017-Teddy Bear Nymph

Guest Blogger: Paul Beel, FrankenFly

Version 2 - tied by Justin Bowman

Version 2 – tied by Justin Bowman

In this blog post I want to concentrate on one of the most well known, effective nymphs that exist, the Hare’s Ear nymph. I don’t want to bore you with details of its history, but concentrate on a modern perspective and new ways to tie it. One thing to mention is that hare’s ear fur has been used for a long time, even as far back as the 1600’s. If you want to know more about its history, I recommend heading over to Flyanglers Online and read an article by Tom Travis where he delves deep into the history of the Hare’s Ear nymph.

The reason this nymph is called a Hare’s Ear is because originally this nymph was tied using the fur found in between the ears of a hare. These days, you can purchase a hare’s mask and get the fur by clipping the hair between the ears. Not only can you use the underfur in this region, but to make it even more buggy, you want to use the guard hairs as well. These days fly tiers will use all parts of the mask to tie a Hare’s Ear. Not only that, but tiers that push the envelope even further, use modern dubbing mixes to tie this popular nymph. more…

Phil’s Fly Rod Evolution

Guest Blogger: Phil Rispin, fly fisher, photographer & more, find Phil’s photography here

evolution of the fly rodThere was a time in my life when I wanted just one good fly rod to go with my meager supply of fly fishing stuff. I had lobbied successfully for a Columbia fly fishing vest for a birthday present some time before but a good fly rod was still financially out of reach for my young family. It was a little funny to watch me if you knew anything about fly fishing because up to that point I used an old spin casting rod that was unusually long and I had turned the handle and real seat around to try and get my Dad’s old fly reel closer to the butt of the rod making it look more like a fly rod. This set up worked through University and into my early married life after graduation. I used my Dad’s old rust colored fly line on the reel and to this I tied some monofilament line with a size 12 Adams or a Royal Coachman from Dad’s old metal fly box and I was good to go. more…

Decades of Deception

Guest Blogger: Mike Cline, Bozeman, Montana

I caught this jack in about a 1' of water off an oyster bed on a big chartreuse deceiver in mid-January. Completely unexpected. Took ~10 minutes to land with a 6 wt and the fish was well into the backing in 10 seconds. Thank goodness for sound knots!

I caught this jack in about a 1′ of water off an oyster bed on a big chartreuse deceiver in mid-January. Completely unexpected. Took ~10 minutes to land with a 6 wt and the fish was well into the backing in 10 seconds. Thank goodness for sound knots!

Deception and trickery imply acts or practices of one who deliberately deceives. Deception may or may not imply blameworthiness, since it may suggest cheating or merely tactical resource. Trickery implies ingenious acts intended to dupe or cheat. Deception is a staple of modern-day football—the play-action pass. Camouflage deceives others into not seeing you. Our pastime—fly fishing is ripe with deception. In fact, the fly fishing industry relies on the most blatant act of deception—getting fish to accept a conglomeration of fur, feathers and/or synthetics secured to a sharp but thin piece of steel as food or prey. From tiny midges to ginormous marlin flies, we fly anglers and fly tiers are masters (relatively speaking) of deception. We tie and present our flies to fish of all sorts with the sole intent to deceive then into accepting the conglomeration we call a fly as food or prey. more…